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Is Creative Commons Flexible Enough for Historians?

By Adam Crymble | November 1, 2013

by Adam Crymble

Creative Commons licenses are incredibly useful. They’re easy to use. More and more people understand them. It’s even possible to do web searches of Creative Commons content making it easy to find content you can use with confidence. The Open Access movement, particularly in the UK, seems to be promoting Creative Commons licensing as the best way to move towards open access to research, because it means we can (largely) leave lawyers out of it all and implement a standard set of licenses that everyone understands (or should understand). I see the practical merits in that and am a big fan of keeping costs at a minimum. But I also see the counterpoint, that many historians feel Creative Commons just isn’t designed for them (see my previous post onAlternative Licensing). Sometimes that feeling is based on a misunderstanding. Sometimes, I think, it’s justified. In the interest of opening that discussion, I thought I’d present a couple of scenarios in which I believe Creative Commons is not flexible enough for historians looking to manage the rights associated with their research.For all of these scenarios, let’s assume the work in question is an academic monograph written solely by me.
Read full post here. (Originally posted October 29, 2013)